Personal Training FAQ

What personal training equipment do I need?

You don’t need any personal training equipment, as your personal trainer I’ll bring everything you need. My fully mobile personal training equipment includes dumbbells, kettlebells 6kg, 8kg, 10kg, 12kg and 14 kg sizes, a range of resistance bands and 15-metre battle ropes, plus exercise mats, skipping ropes, in-fact everything you’ll need for your bespoke training programme. You just need to wear appropriate gym kit and comfortable trainers.

Is my home or office large enough for a personal training session?

If you can clear a space of around two square metres (approximately seven square feet) , then your home or office will be suitable for personal training. This small space is ideal for a high intensity interval training workout, perhaps with kettlebells, dumbbells. If you have a large patio or garden then you may have the space for battle ropes, these aren’t suitable for indoor use.


How do I book and pay for a personal training session with you?

To book my taster introductory personal training offer, a one 2 one session or block of 10 or 20 one 2 one personal training sessions please call or text me on 07730 038830. You need to pay in advance for your taster introductory personal training offer, a one 2 one personal training session or block of 10 or 20 one 2 one personal training sessions. I accept cash, personal cheque or bank transfer.


What if I can’t make the personal training session?

As your personal trainer I like to be flexible when at all possible. If you give me at least 24-hour’s notice either to cancel your personal training session or to rearrange it, then I will cancel without penalty or rebook you to a mutually convenient date and time. If you cancel with less than 24-hour’s notice, I’ll let you off the first time this happens as a goodwill gesture but thereafter you will forfeit that session. At my discretion and in extenuating circumstances I may waive this.


Are you a qualified personal trainer?

Yes, I hold a Level 3 Diploma in Gym Instructing and Personal Training through YMCAfit in London, one of the UK’s leading providers. In addition to this, I have a further qualification with YMCAfit; Exercise for Older Adults, a specialism as an older adult personal trainer that I’m developing both within 3Fs Personal Training and through the Young At Heart Keep Fit Club, group fitness classes for people aged 60 and above.


Do you run fitness classes?

Yes, as one of the co-founders of the Young At Heart Keep Fir Club, I run weekly exercise classes for people aged 60 and above in South Portslade Community Century every Monday starting at 12.45pm, St. Helens Church Hall, Hangleton, Hove every Friday starting at 1.30pm, and from the 25th April at Lancing Parish Council Jubilee Hall every Thursday starting at 10.15am. Classes cost £5 including after class refreshments.


Do you offer an introductory offer?

Yes! I offer a free 60-minute health and fitness consultation as a starting point when we first meet. You can then take advantage of my introductory offer; two 1-hour personal training sessions for just £45 where you can get a flavour for the way I work as a personal trainer with my clients and the value I bring in terms of expertise, inspiration, education and motivation. You can choose the venue, your home, office, outdoors or private studio. An inexpensive way to try my personal training.


Can you recommend a suitable outdoor venue for our personal training session?

Yes. If you live in or around Brighton and Hove, then we are spoilt for choice when it comes to outdoor locations. Hove Lawns is a perennial favourite but there are other beach areas that make for an exhilarating workout. Brighton and Hove has a wide range of Parks and Gardens suitable for a variety of workouts including battle ropes, high intensity interval training and circuit training. I regularly use Hove Park.


Are there any hidden costs?

No. There are no hidden costs in any of the personal training services I offer. My standard personal training rate is £35 per hour, and there’s a small discount if you book a block of 20 for £660 (equivalent to £33 per hour). If you elect to train in a private studio or hall a supplement of £10 per hour applies. I offer a free 60-minute health and fitness consultation, and an introductory offer of two 1-hour personal training sessions for just £45.


Can our personal training session take place in my local gym?

No. Most gyms will only allow personal trainers employed by them to train clients. Therefore, as a self-employed personal trainer it is unlikely that they will permit me to train you. However, my fully mobile exercise equipment can give you a full body workout and offers you a more interesting workout than simply jumping on the bog-standard cardio and resistance machines that your gym has to offer.


Are you insured?

Yes. I have a specialist personal trainer’s Public Liability Insurance Policy the limit of which is £10,000,000 for any one event. The personal trainer policy is underwritten by Aviva Insurance Limited. I am happy to show you my current personal trainer insurance certificate. In addition to my public liability insurance, I also have a current clean CRB check certificate also available for inspection, I take my duty of care and safeguarding as a personal trainer very seriously indeed.


Am I too old to have a personal trainer?

No, you’re never too old to benefit from taking up exercise with a personal trainer. And there’s a wealth of scientific research to that show no matter what your age 50, 60, 70 and above, regular exercise will stop and even reverse many age-related conditions. I have a personal trainer qualification in Exercise for Older Adults, and I’m a recommended personal trainer for the over 60s. Let me train you!


I have recently had a major operation can you help me restart exercise safely?

Yes. I have helped many clients restart exercise after major surgery including abdominal surgery, surgery of major joints such as knee and shoulder, as well as helping clients who have suffered serious fractures to bone(s). I often work in conjunction with my client’s Surgeon and/or Physiotherapist following their major surgery. This helps me to design a post-operative exercise program that will build on what the Surgeon and/or Physio has suggested and this will see you through to complete recovery from your major surgery.

While everyone is unique, different surgical operations require specific approaches, the common factor here though is to be careful not to do too much too soon, rather build gradually to prevent injury and delay complete recovery from your major surgery.

Having personally gone through major abdominal surgery; by having my spleen removed, I can use my own unique insights to help you recover fully by restarting exercise safely, so that you can live a fully independent lifestyle.


I have a serious injury can you help me with my rehabilitation to restart exercise?

Yes. I have helped many clients restart exercise after injury including major joints such as the knee, hip and shoulders. For injury rehabilitation I often work in conjunction with my client’s Physiotherapist, as a Physio is generally your first port of call when injured. This joined up approach helps me to design an rehabilitation from injury exercise programme that will build on what your Physio has suggested and will see you through to complete recovery from injury.

While everyone is unique the common factor when restarting exercise is to be careful not to do too much too soon, rather build gradually to prevent further injury and delay complete recovery.

Goals are likely to include; regaining full strength and range of movement of your knee, hip or shoulder or other joint/limb, significantly rebuilding your endurance, being able to live a fully independent lifestyle, for example, getting up and down stairs, in and out of the bath, getting dressed and undressed.


I have had total hip replacement surgery can you help me restart exercise safely?

Yes. I can help you following total hip replacement surgery. It’s common that after a total hip replacement you’ll be keen to get back as soon as possible to leading a fully active lifestyle. After all you’re now likely to be pain free for the first time in years!

Initially you will follow the instructions from your Surgeon and/or Physiotherapist, a set of exercises designed specially to aid your recovery after total hip replacement surgery. While everyone is unique, the common factor is to be careful not to do too much too soon, rather build gradually to prevent injury and delay complete recovery from your total hip replacement surgery.

For total hip replacement surgery during the initial six weeks your major fitness goals will include strengthening and balance training as you progress to walking without the use of walking aids.

From week seven to twelve my focus to help you recover from total hip replacement will be on more advanced fitness goals. Goals are likely to include; regaining full strength and range of movement, significantly rebuilding your endurance, living a fully independent lifestyle, for example, getting up and down stairs, getting dressed.


I have had a knee replacement surgery can you help me restart exercise safely?

Yes. I can help you following knee replacement surgery. You will likely want to get back to a fully active lifestyle after knee replacement surgery. Not least because you’re now likely to be pain free for the first time in years! Your leg muscles are likely to be weak as you will probably have been inactive due to your knee problems.

Initially you will follow the instructions from your Surgeon and/or Physiotherapist, a set of exercises designed specially to aid your recovery after knee replacement surgery. While everyone is unique, the common factor is to be careful not to do too much too soon, rather build gradually to prevent injury and delay complete recovery from your knee replacement surgery. It is important that you do these exercises to required frequency. For example, your-Surgeon and/or Physiotherapist may tell you that you need to exercise for 20 - 30 minutes 2 - 3 times per day as well as 30 minutes of walking 2 or 3 times a day during the initial recovery period.

While everyone is unique, my general approach following knee replacement surgery will be to strengthen all the muscles above and below your knee, restoring your range of movement. Think Glutes and Legs! Supporting your goal of getting back to an active lifestyle.


I have High Blood Pressure can I exercise?

Yes. You can exercise if you have high blood pressure. You should always consult your doctor first. Your doctor will probably already have told you that being inactive is linked to high blood pressure.

If your blood pressure is relatively high, your doctor may initially prefer to lower it with medicines before you start on an exercise programme.

I can develop a specific exercise program to help you lower your blood pressure, as well as supplying you with all the motivation needed to help you exercise regularly.


I have Type 2 Diabetes can I exercise?

Yes. If you have Type 2 Diabetes, exercise is an important part of your treatment plan.  It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and to maintain your blood glucose levels often the use of insulin. If you keep fit and active you will be able to better control your type 2 diabetes as well as keeping your blood glucose levels within the safe range.

I can develop a specific exercise program to help you better control your Type 2 Diabetes, as well as supplying you with all the motivation needed to help you exercise regularly.


I have Osteoporosis can I exercise?

Yes. You can and indeed should exercise if you have Osteoporosis. In-fact, weight-bearing exercise is by far one of the best approaches to prevent and delay Osteoporosis. It can assist in the maintenance of bone density in individuals who have been diagnosed with Osteopenia or Ososteoporosis. In addition to weight-bearing exercise, strength-training and balance training can be beneficial in helping to prevent trips and falls and making it easier to lead a fully independent lifestyle.

For people with severe Osteoporosis, and those individuals who have already broken a bone particular caution is necessary as high-impact activities, such as running or skipping, could lead to compression fractures of the spine, and tripping and falling during these high-impact activities could cause serious wrist or other bone fractures. A safer and more cautious approach for many people with Oosteoporosis would be a combination of:

  • Low-impact moderate-intensity activity, for example, walking.
  • Resistance training using your own body weight, resistance bands, or light dumbbells, for example, attending one of my Young at Heart Keep Fit Club classes.
  • Balance training, for example, walking heel to toe as though walking on a tightrope.

I can develop a specific exercise program to help you better manage your Osteoarthritis, as well as supplying you with all the motivation needed to help you exercise regularly.


I have Osteoarthritis can I exercise?

Yes you can and indeed should exercise if you have Osteoarthritis. Given the pain associated with Osteoarthritis, exercise is possibly the last thing you’ll want to do. However, exercise is a vital part of successful Osteoarthritis treatment to better manage your pain and to ensure that you can stay active and lead a fully independent lifestyle, for example, getting up and down stairs, in and out of the bath, getting dressed and undressed.

Osteoarthritis is a chronic and progressive condition with loss of the cartilage that covers and protects the ends of your bones where they meet at a joint, for example knee and hip. Without this protective coating, your bones rub together, causing irritation and inflammation. The common result is pain and stiffness in your joint or joints and pain in the muscles and ligaments that surround them.

I can develop a specific exercise program to help you better manage your Osteoarthritis, as well as supplying you with all the motivation needed to help you exercise regularly.



I have Rheumatoid Arthritis can I exercise?

Yes, for many people with Rheumatoid Arthritis, regular exercise can be hugely beneficial for relieving pain and joint stiffness. Exercising and stretching can be particularly helpful during a flare up. Exercising can reduce painful symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis, improving joint function and flexibility, increasing your range of movement, as well as being beneficial to your mood.

Personal Training Enquiry


    Gav O’Brien 3Fs Personal Training

    Telephone: 07730 038830